If you fancy some chicken nuggets on your next visit to Rome, you might be treated to more than just your dinner.

A McDonald’s south of the Italian capital sits just above an exceptionally well-preserved stretch of Roman road, complete with the skeletons of three men.

The fast food chain opened its doors and Roman road to the public this week, allowing tourists to explore the area while eating.

Three skeletons were also found beneath the McDonalds and are believed to have been buried there in the 3rd century after the road decayed.

The 2,000-year-old street was first discovered in 2014 when the McDonald’s was built in Frattocchie, Italy.

Archaeologists helped excavate the site, and McDonald’s itself contributed 300,000 euros (£250,000/$320,000) to the excavation.

The paved road is believed to have connected to the Via Appia – one of the busiest roads in ancient Rome, which ran from Rome to Brindisi on the coast.

Named after the Roman official Appius Claudius Caecus, the street became known as “Regina Viarium”, which translates to “Queen of the Roads”. zzz

Speaking to The Telegraph, zzz. Alfonsina Russo, Superintendent of Archeology in Rome, said: “We believe that it was a secondary road that connected the Appian Way to a settlement or perhaps an important property such as a wealthy nobleman’s villa or an imperial estate.

“Unfortunately, only this section survived – the rest was destroyed. But it is of great historical importance.

“The Appian Way was traveled by famous figures such as (the Roman poet) Horace, who told of his journey from Rome to Brindisi in his satires.”

Mario Federico, head of McDonald’s Italia, said: “This is our first museum restaurant. “We were able to give a piece of the Roman road back to the local community and all of Italy”

The paved road is believed to have connected to the Via Appia – one of the busiest roads in ancient Rome, which ran from Rome to Brindisi on the coast

A McDonalds south of the Italian capital sits just above an exceptionally well-preserved stretch of Roman road, complete with the skeletons of three men
The street under McDonald’s is about 45 meters long and two meters wide.

It was founded in the 2nd century B.C. Constructed in the 3rd century AD, but fell into disuse in the 3rd century.

Three bodies were also found beneath the McDonalds, believed to have been buried there in the 3rd century.

Inside the restaurant, guests can see the old street through a transparent panel in the floor, or venture there themselves

The 2,000-year-old street was first discovered in 2014 when the McDonald’s was built in Frattocchie, Italy. Archaeologists helped excavate the site, and McDonald’s itself pledged 300,000 euros (£250,000/$320,000) to the dig Pamela Cerino, an archaeologist who worked on the dig, told The Telegraph: “The skeletons belong to three men, one of whom the oldest was aged 35-40.’

A fourth skeleton was also found under a nearby gas station with a coin in its mouth – believed to be an offering to Charon, a character from Greek mythology.

Inside the restaurant, guests can see the old street through a transparent panel in the floor, or venture there themselves.

The street under McDonald’s is about 45 meters long and two meters wide. It was founded in the 2nd century B.C. Built in the 3rd century AD, but shut down in the 3rd century Mario Federico, head of McDonald’s Italia, said: “This is our first museum restaurant.

“We were able to give back part of the Roman road to the local community and all of Italy.

“The project is a good example of how the public and private sectors can work together effectively in cultural heritage recovery.”

A McDonald’s employee holds up an information leaflet about the Roman road under the restaurant

The fast food chain opened its doors and the Roman road to the public this week, allowing tourists to explore the area while they eat