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Photos: Ancient Tomb of ‘Grand Lady’ Discovered in China

Final resting place

Photo courtesy Chinese Cultural Relics

Archaeologists in China have uncovered the tomb of a 900 year-old “Grand Lady,” as writing found in her tomb calls her, in China. The inner coffin of the Grand Lady is shown here. It contains paintings of the Grand Lady wearing different clothes and accessories, archaeologists believe. [Read more about the discovery of the Grand Lady tomb]

Home in eternity

Photo courtesy Chinese Cultural Relics

The Grand Lady was buried with many interesting artifacts including this model of a wooden house. The house has a courtyard and three rooms. Altogether it is about 34 cm (13.4 inches) wide and 19.6 cm (7.7 inches) in height. Tiny models of a table and chair were found inside the house.

Staggering detailPhoto courtesy Chinese Cultural Relics

This silver pendant, found within the Grand Lady’s coffin, has an image that depicts two dragons who are shown chasing pearls archaeologists say. It’s about 9.4 cm (3.7 inches) long and 7.1 cm (2.8 inches) wide.

Entertainment included

Photo courtesy Chinese Cultural Relics

Numerous figurines were found in the Grand Lady’s tomb. The figurines of 10 female music performers who are wearing masks are shown in this photo. They are made of wood.

High society

Photo courtesy Chinese Cultural Relics

This wooden figurine shows four men carrying a sedan chair. A high ranking person in China would have been carried around in a chair like this.

To protect and serve

Photo courtesy Chinese Cultural Relics

The photo shows several wooden figurines, found in the tomb, that depict warriors and servants.

Beauty divine

Photo courtesy Chinese Cultural Relics

One of the silver hairpins that the Grand Lady was buried with. It is 20.4 cm (8 inches) long and is in the shape of flowers and leaves.

Identifying marks

Photo courtesy Chinese Cultural Relics

This banner, found on top of her coffin, has writing which identifies the tomb occupant as a “Grand Lady” who lived in “Ankang Commandery.” Her name is hard to see but archaeologists believe that it may be “née Jian.” She lived during the Song Dynasty, a time when art, culture and science flourished in China.